[Cortina-list] mpg's

cortinaphil at cox.net cortinaphil at cox.net
Mon Feb 1 23:00:37 UTC 2016


Not many racing Mk II's in North America. Go get 'em Gerald.
---- Gerald Elliott via Cortina-list <cortina-list at lotus-cortina.com> wrote: 
> Hi Peter
> As I mentioned in a previous email to the Forum, I had decided to rebuild my Cortina Mk2 race car.
> As I am disabled, it takes me a somewhat longer time to get anything done compared to my younger years. I am almost down to a bare body shell, removed all the paint on the engine compartment and the outside of the inner front fenders back to the door posts. Now removing the paint on the passenger floor including the inner firewall. Sure glad I went this route as I have found a few nasty surprises - eg when I removed both front strut tower reinforcement panels I found cracks in the upper original panels . I have been cleaning and painting plus replacing hardware as I go, plus modified/ lightened/fabricated those parts that needed it. One goal has to  remove at least 100 lb by deleting what was no longer required- ie windshield and it's rubber 
> (replacing with lexan as windshield was cracked and rubber very badly deteriorated ) , windshield wiper, inline defrost fan, Accusump and it's hose system,etc
> 
> Now preparing her to go on my rotisserie to get at the bottom plus with her turned 90* I can then access more of the interior. With my disability I cannot get into the car over the roll cage, actually I could probably get in but getting out would an impossibility without a lot of assistance .
> My wife is always available to help get me get up off the floor or ground when I fall, but getting me out of the race car is another story.
>  We are both approaching 70 physically but mentally still in our 50's, so have to be careful what we attempt to do. Sure wish my race crew were more help on the car, they do the heavy work removing the drivetrain and suspension but leave the grunge work to me. Good thing I enjoy doing the work.
> I should mention that the strut tower reinforcing panels were purchased from a Ford dealer in the early 70's. Surprising what the local Ford dealers carried in stock way back then.
> Cheers
> Gerald Elliott
> Elliott Racing
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> On 2016-01-31, at 11:17 PM, Peter Pentz via Cortina-list <cortina-list at lotus-cortina.com> wrote:
> 
> > Hi Mike,
> > You are just way to kind to me buddy.
> > 
> > It's a long story - bear with me ......
> > Coming off the Waterford Hills event the biggest concern I had was the
> > persistent misfire that I had been bugged with, and had never cured for the
> > past 3 seasons. Having been embarrassed by it in front of the best brains in
> > the game I became determined to figure it out.
> > The biggest hint to the problem was the unstable high RPM ignition timing.
> > So I set about pulling the distributor and analyzing the problem.
> > It turned out that in fitting the pointless trigger in the distributor, we
> > had managed to fit the trigger base plate in such a way that the screw
> > bottomed on the under-plate, and the trigger was moving about (evidenced by
> > the burring around the clamp screw).
> > So expecting I had cured the problem, I decided on a whim to do a club event
> > at my local Mid-West Council Club 2 weeks after the Waterford Hills event.
> > One of the problem with these events at this level is that there is a 50%
> > mix of real classic folks who value their machinery (count me in that group)
> > and a group of scrappy cars driven by people who think Vintage is a cheap
> > form of racing.
> > And there lies a huge debate and lesson ......
> > The event is made up, as normal of an early morning practice, a mid-day
> > qualifier, and an afternoon race.
> > 
> > In the practice in 50 to 60 degree early morning conditions, on the 3rd lap,
> > some idiot in a Corvette tagged me on the LH rear wing exiting the fastest
> > LH corner (3rd gear 100 MPH corner) as I was getting on it hard. 
> > The hit knocked me off line and I shot off the track across the track and
> > into the bushes on the inside of the corner.
> > The damage was a slightly bent LH rear wheel arch, and a bent hood, and
> > front LH corner along with a broken headlight and bent grill.
> > 
> > The initial panic was finding the replacement for the headlight, grill, and
> > hood. We found a headlight and grill, actually several of the unique square
> > headlights and grill, pretty quickly, but the hood was a problem. We ended
> > up settling for a fiberglass hood, and we ordered a new slam plate, and
> > front valance.
> > As always, Steve Booker in the UK came to my rescue - he is absolutely the
> > finder of the rare ! Thank you Steve !
> > 
> > The front Valance and slam plate are replaced, the ding in the rear wing
> > repaired, and right now we are in grey primer ready for final paint. So the
> > old dog will be up and screaming next season.
> > 
> > What did we learn from this episode ?  Classic racing can be an expensive
> > time consuming exercise, outside of the usual mechanical mysteries.  Club
> > racing is a definite big exposure, but racing at the VSCDA, SVRA level is
> > not much better - Don Heth can attest to that.
> > What is the difference though?
> > 
> > Well, let the two incidents be the judge - In Don's case, not only did the
> > guy who hit him apologize immediately, he actually helped fund the repair to
> > Don's car, and in my case the Corvette owner never even came over to
> > acknowledge the incedent with me - and he was pitted right next to me ! What
> > a Jackarse ...... 
> > 
> > Will I race in Midwest Council again - well maybe, but I sure as hell will
> > keep an eye on my mirrors.
> > 
> > At the end of the day, the Scort was in need of a refresh, so all new paint,
> > new stickers - ye hah !
> > 
> > Peter Pentz
> > Campton Hills, Illinois, USA
> > 
> > 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Cortina-list [mailto:cortina-list-bounces at lotus-cortina.com] On Behalf
> > Of Mikecortinagt--- via Cortina-list
> > Sent: Sunday, January 31, 2016 8:10 PM
> > To: cortina-list at lotus-cortina.com
> > Cc: Mikecortinagt at aol.com
> > Subject: Re: [Cortina-list] mpg's
> > 
> > 
> > Peter...When did you crash the Escort?? 
> >                                    And how badly??
> >                                    If you can restore that Lotus Cortina
> >                                    you can repair almost anything.
> > 
> > 
> > In a message dated 1/31/2016 8:56:39 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
> > cortina-list at lotus-cortina.com writes:
> > 
> > You guys  never fail to amaze me ......
> > Personally I couldn't give 2 cents as to how  mucking around with an O2
> > sensor on a Pontiac (?!) has anything to do with  matters Cortina, let alone
> > Fomoco. It's not even a related product  !
> > 
> > This is not a general motoring / gearhead forum, if you don't have  anything
> > Cortina / Fomoco relevant to say guys, don't say it !
> > Is anyone  monitoring this forum ?
> > 
> > Just my 2 cents.
> > 
> > BTW - still busy  repairing the damage to my race Scort Twincam - why do I
> > keep on torturing  myself with doing body repairs myself ?
> > 
> > Peter Pentz
> > Campton Hills,  Illinois, USA
> > 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Cortina-list  [mailto:cortina-list-bounces at lotus-cortina.com] On
> > Behalf Of Jon Sherbeck  via Cortina-list
> > Sent: Sunday, January 31, 2016 6:50 PM
> > To:  cortina-list at lotus-cortina.com
> > Cc: Jon Sherbeck
> > Subject: [Cortina-list]  mpg's
> > 
> > John,
> > 
> > Thanks for the response.  I had not heard of  the narrow band sensor
> > tactics.
> > 
> > I did not envision a permanent lean,  just one to take place under cruise
> > conditions where inlet heating would  lower the lean combustion instability
> > limit.  And I think you are  right about the NOX issue, but when was acid
> > rain last in the news?   Its all about the global warming now.  From what
> > I've read, inlet  heating limits the maximum power by detonation, and the
> > lean combustion  limit goes down with increased heating.  I think at the
> > limit, at  least some precombustion reactions occur, which significantly
> > reduce the  lean limit.  This: http://www.376mpg.com/, the fabled 75  mpg
> > carburetor of the mid 70's, and Smokey Yunick's hot vapor system are  all of
> > the same ilk.  Some heat reduces charge density, and therefore  vacuum work,
> > more reduces the lean combustion limit, at the risk of  introducing knock
> > which could be a problem.  So I am not looking to  destroy my engine, but
> > still stick it to big oil.
> > 
> > Jon
> > -----  Original Message -----
> > From: "John Miller via Cortina-list"  <cortina-list at lotus-cortina.com>
> > To:  <cortina-list at lotus-cortina.com>
> > Cc: "John Miller"  <jem at milleredp.com>
> > Sent: Sunday, January 31, 2016 4:41  PM
> > Subject: Re: [Cortina-list] Helllooooo?!?
> > 
> > 
> >>> I have not  heard from anyone on the list either.  Nothing Cortina  
> >>> related to report, I am working on a hot/cold inlet for my Pontiac
> > Vibe,
> >>> hoping to push into the 50 mpg range.  Does anyone know  what the 
> >>> Wood's gas guys do to game the fuel injection into  running lean?  
> >>> Something with the O2 sensor?  Add  resistance, or voltage to the signal?
> >> 
> >> If you're running a  wideband O2 sensor and a reasonably configurable 
> >> ECU you can target  any AFR you want.
> >> 
> >> My understanding at a high level (because  that's as much as I heard
> > about 
> >> it, not in specifics) of how a  certain automaker did this some years 
> >> ago with conventional  narrow-band O2 sensors of the time (not 
> >> particularly being EPA legal,  of course) was to build logic into the 
> >> ECU to detect
> > when
> > 
> >> the  engine had settled into a reasonably-close-to-steady-state light
> > load 
> >> condition, and when in that condition it would reduce the fuel flow 
> >> by some percentage of a short-term average for a short period,  
> >> periodically returning to stoich to reevaluate load and  fuel-flow.
> >> 
> >> There are conditions where you don't want to be  running lean, of 
> >> course, so a permanent lean-bias could be a  dangerous (and likely to 
> >> blow your smog-test NOx readings)  thing.
> >> 
> >> John Miller.
> >> 
> >> 
> >> 
> >> Cortina-list mailing list
> >> Cortina-list at lotus-cortina.com
> >> 
> >> http://lotus-cortina.com/mailman/listinfo/cortina-list_lotus-cortina.c
> >> om
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
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